Preserving the Last of Summer Produce – A Roundup

Preserving Late Summer Produce - Waste not, want not!

The Horrific and Mysterious Tale of the Rotting Produce

Once, in a dark and dreary land called the kitchen, there lived a potato. This potato was firm and hard and prepared to stay in his pile of potatoes through all the fall months and into winter. But his friends were not in such good shape. The eggplants and melons were the first to go. Then the tomatoes. The bags of produce on the counter were a veritable graveyard of mold. And the potato despaired. What would his owner eat with him when the time came? Would she have anything else left???

Preserving Late Summer Produce - Waste not, want not!

The truth is, I haven’t done all that well with keeping up with my CSA (community supported agriculture) produce lately and I have a bit of a…problem in bags on my counter, or shoved into my fridge.

So this post is as much to help me prepare for winter and reduce my food waste as it is to help inform you! I’ve collected these links and a Pinterest board based on what I have in my kitchen and what I think needs to be done with it to suit my habits. I’d love to hear more recipes and ideas from you in the comments! What do you do when you’re overwhelmed with too much produce?

NOTE: since I don’t have time to cook and eat all my CSA produce, I definitely don’t have time to do any canning this year, though I love that method! For you canners out there, how do you make time for it and what are recipes you love? I’d love to save them for next year!

SECOND NOTE: This is a round-up of different links I’ve found around the web. I’m not affiliated with any of these sites.

Salad greens:

This site refers  to any type of greens as far as I can tell! You can freeze them whole and fresh in a plastic bag, or according to another article, blanch for two minutes in boiling water first. You can also puree them with a little water and put them in ice cube trays. Either way, you have something handy to grab for smoothies in the morning, especially on cold, dark winter mornings when your body is craving vegetables and iron and freshness.

You can also can or dehydrate leafy greens. This article gives good ideas for putting your dried greens, powdered, into a variety of things, even oatmeal, to slip greens into your diet!

For more detailed instructions, and more ideas on how to use them, click here.

Tomatoes

A crazy volunteer tomato plant popped up in my flower bed. It’s gotten so big and sprawling, I’m daily worried about my HOA complaining. I plan on using this method to freeze them before the weather tries to get cold again. It looks so easy! You don’t even have to chop them, just drop them in the water whole!

Preserving Late Summer Produce - Waste not, want not!

Squash

Butternut, Pumpkin, Delicata, Acorn, I’m overflowing with squash. I plan on letting these sit out as fall decorations as long as they’ll let me. It’s nice, because I already paid for their presence in my CSA from my grocery budget, so they’re basically doubling as free fall decorations! When I feel the need to save them from a horror story fate, I’ll probably use this method that doesn’t even involve cooking! I thought the squash would have to be cooked first, but was surprised to learn (at least according to Pinterest) that’s not the case. This makes it much easier to keep the squash versatile so I can decide later what to make out of it!

Okra

I don’t have much okra left as it never lasts long in my house (yum!) but I wish I did because I found so many different ways to prepare it! Looks like I have the option to freeze it plain, breaded, or dehydrate it. No matter how I do it I know it’ll taste fantastic.

These are just a few of the vegetables hanging around my kitchen. What do you have in yours?

Enjoy preserving it and preparing for winter!

 

DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images, attachments, and other material are for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read.

 
Bethany
Bethany is a contributing writer for Whole Intentions. She's new to the adventure of whole eating. Originally a skeptic, one day whole food clicked for her. She takes a common sense approach to whole eating; essentially, if God made it that way, why mess with it? Though she'd love to raise a family, bees, and goats on a homestead somewhere, Bethany is single and lives in a tiny condo on the edge of Nashville where she's just starting to work on this thing called adulthood, and what a "whole life" built around God actually looks like. She's learned though that whole living and eating are possible even in the big city and loves to share how it's possible. Bethany blogs about her journey with whole living, eating, faith, and singleness at bethanyrossbrown.com.
About The Author

Bethany

Bethany is a contributing writer for Whole Intentions. She's new to the adventure of whole eating. Originally a skeptic, one day whole food clicked for her. She takes a common sense approach to whole eating; essentially, if God made it that way, why mess with it? Though she'd love to raise a family, bees, and goats on a homestead somewhere, Bethany is single and lives in a tiny condo on the edge of Nashville where she's just starting to work on this thing called adulthood, and what a "whole life" built around God actually looks like. She's learned though that whole living and eating are possible even in the big city and loves to share how it's possible. Bethany blogs about her journey with whole living, eating, faith, and singleness at bethanyrossbrown.com.

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