Bloom Where Your Herb Garden’s Planted

Bloom Where Your Herb Garden's Planted | Whole Intentions

Bloom Where Your Herb Garden's Planted | Whole Intentions

 

When I first started researching whole-eating and natural living, my all or nothing personality had me ready to move to a farm, buy a herd of goats, and take up beekeeping.

One of these days, I may get my homestead. ūüėČ

But until I get there, I’m paying down a mortgage on a¬†townhouse in suburban Nashville where my¬†HOA won’t let me¬†plant vegetable bearing plants in front of my¬†house (even though¬†that’s the only place there’s sun and I¬†promised to keep them in pretty pots).

At first I thought that meant I was doomed to processed, unhealthy living until I get married, buy a farm, and live happily ever after.

But God’s been teaching me to appreciate the gifts of the moment better. And that means looking around for solutions that can bring whole living to me where I am now. Ways I can be a better steward of what I have right here and now. I’m hoping I can share some of those with you here.

A miniature herb garden

lavendarmint

One of my solutions is the¬†miniature herb garden I planted on my front porch this spring. No vegetable bearing plants here! Just pretty, delicate herbs that smell beautiful when they’re wet after the rain.

I didn’t know¬†what I was doing when I got started, so I started with the first step anyone uses these days.

1. I went to Pinterest. I’ve seen so many beautiful little herb gardens with miniature worlds built into them on Pinterest, so I started an inspiration board. I also included pins about the types of herbs I wanted and how to care for them. Check out my board here.

2. I collected some supplies. The pots I’ve amassed from various yard sales, Freecycle hauls, and family members. The broken china came mostly from one major crash that sent both my cats across the room and halfway up the stairs in terror.

3. The herbs. At first I wanted to do this garden all for free, but that didn’t quite work out. It started well. I got mint, violets, and succulents from my mom at Easter. Then I found thyme, oregano, and sage available on Freecycle (if this place isn’t in your life it needs to be).

I had to supplement this with some herbs from a local nursery. Catmint. Lavender. Marjoram. Cilantro. But these were only $3 apiece, so I still went easy on the budget.

I know only a few of the applications of these herbs so far. Lavender is good for relaxation. Marjoram is great with vegetables, or so the guy at the nursery said! Catmint is good in tea and it will keep the pests away from the rest of my garden.

I know I’m going to appreciate these herbs f0r cooking¬†with my CSA vegetables this summer.

Until then, I’ve got some research to do!

Don’t let perfection stop you

succulents

The important thing is that I didn’t let the lack of the “perfect” circumstances stop me from taking my first step in the gardening department!

It’s so easy to think we’re going to arrive somewhere, where everything will click into place one day.¬†But here on earth, nothing’s every going to be quite perfect. It’s complicated and messy instead. But I’m done letting that stop me from moving forward with the dreams and goals God has put before me now.¬†

What’s something you’ve been putting off for the “perfect” time? What are some¬†small steps you can take toward that goal right now?

Bloom Where Your Herb Garden's Planted | Whole Intentions

Bethany Brown
Bethany is a contributing writer for Whole Intentions. She's new to the adventure of whole eating. Originally a skeptic, one day whole food clicked for her. She takes a common sense approach to whole eating; essentially, if God made it that way, why mess with it? Though she'd love to raise a family, bees, and goats on a homestead somewhere, Bethany is single and lives in a tiny condo on the edge of Nashville where she's just starting to work on this thing called adulthood, and what a "whole life" built around God actually looks like. She's learned though that whole living and eating are possible even in the big city and loves to share how it's possible. Bethany blogs about her journey with whole living, eating, faith, and singleness at bethanyrossbrown.com.
About The Author

Bethany Brown

Bethany is a contributing writer for Whole Intentions. She's new to the adventure of whole eating. Originally a skeptic, one day whole food clicked for her. She takes a common sense approach to whole eating; essentially, if God made it that way, why mess with it? Though she'd love to raise a family, bees, and goats on a homestead somewhere, Bethany is single and lives in a tiny condo on the edge of Nashville where she's just starting to work on this thing called adulthood, and what a "whole life" built around God actually looks like. She's learned though that whole living and eating are possible even in the big city and loves to share how it's possible. Bethany blogs about her journey with whole living, eating, faith, and singleness at bethanyrossbrown.com.

2 Comments

  • Bethany,

    You couldn’t be more right about putting things off. I have seen this so often in my friends and family. They look at my garden and go….I could never do that….so they don’t even try! I didn’t START HERE. I did what you did, took it one step at a time and learned from my mistakes along the way. Great advice for anyone who is scared to try gardening for fear that they will kill their plants. WHO CARES? It only in the trying that we learn the skills to succeed.

    • Bethany Brown

      Reply Reply May 8, 2015

      Thanks Sarah! I totally agree with you. I’ve already learned some things from my failed garden last year that I’d never have learned if I hadn’t tried and now I’m doing better than last year already! It’s definitely not the end of the world if a few plants die along the way.

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