Gluten-Free Bread – That Tastes Like Wheat!

A #GlutenFree bread that tastes as close to wheat as the real thing! - WholeIntentions.com

A #GlutenFree bread that tastes as close to wheat as the real thing! - WholeIntentions.comFor those of you who’ve heard the diagnosis: gluten allergy and, in a state of shock, wondered if you would ever eat a slice of bread again. . .

For those of you who have painstakingly doled out the absolutely outrageously, inconceivable sum of money for a pathetically little loaf of gluten-free bread. . .

And for those of you who have bit into a slice of that bread, sucked in the sawdust, and fell to your knees wailing, “this is gluten-free bread?!”

It’s to you I dedicate this recipe.

After trying for nearly a year, I finally found a recipe that tastes as close to homemade wheat bread as any I’ve tried yet.

This makes one loaf although I usually double it because we go through it so fast.

And now, without further ado. . .

Wonderful Gluten-Free Bread (gluten-free)
3 c. GF Flour Mix
2 t. xanthan gum
1/2 T. celtic sea salt
3 T. rapadura or cane sugar (I’ve cut the amount in half and no one noticed – I doubt you’d even need it except for the yeast.)
1/2 T. dry yeast
2 t. coconut oil
1 1/2 c. + 2 T. warm water

Directions:
1. Grease one 8×4 loaf pan. Heat oven to 200 degrees F and then turn the oven off.

2. Combine GF Flour Mix, xanthan gum, celtic sea salt, sugar, and dry yeast in a medium sized bowl and whisk together. Set aside.

3. Combine the coconut oil and warm water together and then combine with the dry ingredients. Mix on high for 2 minutes. This should resemble a thick cake batter.

4. Pour batter into greased bread pan, cover with plastic wrap (optional but helps top appear smoother), and set in warmed oven to rise. Shut the oven door.

5. The bread will take about 20 min. to rise to just below the top of the pan. Carefully take the pan out and set aside. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.

6. Let the bread sit on the counter just until it rises to the top of the pan. Place the pan in the oven and bake for 10 min.

7. Place a tin foil ‘tent’ over the bread (resist all temptation to poke it!) and bake for an additional 35-45 minutes.

8. Test the bread with a toothpick. After you’ve removed the bread from the oven, immediately rub the top with a stick of butter. Let the loaf cool about 5 minutes before removing to a wire rack. And no matter what, do not lick the top of the loaf.

9. Let cool completely before cutting. I can never resist cutting just a small corner, but it cuts much, much easier if you let it cool first.

These also work great as pull-apart dinner rolls. If you let the dough sit a bit longer after you’ve mixed it, it will thicken to the point that you can scoop the dough in a muffin-sized scoop and drop it in rows of three. I leave a bit of room in between them, maybe a 1/2 to 1 inch or so.

I use a 9×13 cake pan that has been greased well. I let them rise about the same time – enough to get just to the top of the pan. I cover them with tin foil for the first ten minutes just like I do the bread and I bake them the same amount of time and at the same temperature.

I often bake a loaf of bread and a pan of dinner rolls in the same oven, right next to each other. Deeeeelicious!

Gluten-Free Bread – That Tastes Like Wheat!

Allergies Gluten-Free
Meal type Breads
Website Whole Intentions

Ingredients

  • 3 cups GF Flour Mix
  • 2 teaspoons xanthan gum
  • 1/2 tablespoon celtic sea salt
  • 3 tablespoons rapadura or cane sugar (I've cut the amount in half and no one noticed - I doubt you'd even need it except for the yeast.)
  • 1/2 tablespoon dry yeast
  • 2 teaspoons coconut oil
  • 1 1/2 cup + 2 Tablespoons warm water

Directions

1. Grease one 8x4 loaf pan. Heat oven to 200 degrees F and then turn the oven off.
2. Combine GF Flour Mix, xanthan gum, celtic sea salt, sugar, and dry yeast in a medium sized bowl and whisk together. Set aside.
3. Combine the coconut oil and warm water together and then combine with the dry ingredients. Mix on high for 2 minutes. This should resemble a thick cake batter.
4. Pour batter into greased bread pan, cover with plastic wrap (optional but helps top appear smoother), and set in warmed oven to rise. Shut the oven door.
5. The bread will take about 20 min. to rise to just below the top of the pan. Carefully take the pan out and set aside. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.
6. Let the bread sit on the counter just until it rises to the top of the pan. Place the pan in the oven and bake for 10 min.
7. Place a tin foil 'tent' over the bread (resist all temptation to poke it!) and bake for an additional 35-45 minutes.
8. Test the bread with a toothpick. After you've removed the bread from the oven, immediately rub the top with a stick of butter. Let the loaf cool about 5 minutes before removing to a wire rack. And no matter what, do not lick the top of the loaf.
9. Let cool completely before cutting. I can never resist cutting just a small corner, but it cuts much, much easier if you let it cool first.

Note

These also work great as pull-apart dinner rolls. If you let the dough sit a bit longer after you've mixed it, it will thicken to the point that you can scoop the dough in a muffin-sized scoop and drop it in rows of three. I leave a bit of room in between them, maybe a 1/2 to 1 inch or so.

I use a 9x13 cake pan that has been greased well. I let them rise about the same time - enough to get just to the top of the pan. I cover them with tin foil for the first ten minutes just like I do the bread and I bake them the same amount of time and at the same temperature.

I often bake a loaf of bread and a pan of dinner rolls in the same oven, right next to each other. Deeeeelicious!

Gluten-Free Bread that tastes like the real deal

Shared with: Make Ahead Meals for Busy Moms, Flour Me With Love, The Healthy Home Economist, The Prairie Homestead, The Modest Mom, Nourishing Traditions, Chef in Training, Time-Warp Wife, Real Food Forager, Young Living Oil Lady, Rook No. 17, Cultured Mama, Vintage Wannabee, Growing Home, Far Above Rubies, Women Living WellThe King’s Court IV, The Gluten-Free Homemaker, Deep Roots at Home, Whole New Mom, Raising Homemakers, This Chick Cooks, It’s A Keeper, GNOWFLGINS, The Greenbacks Gal, Our Simple Country Life, The Nourishing Gourmet, Real Food Renegade, Real Food Whole Health, Comfy in the Kitchen, Raising Mighty Arrows, Healthy 2day Wednesdays,

Paula
I’m Paula - like many of you I wear a lot of hats. Child of God, wife of 20 years, homeschooling mom of 6 earthly children, reluctant cook, chocolate-snatcher, and health and fitness coach at WholeIntentionsFitness.com. Various family health issues including Lyme disease and candida has turned me into a 'researcher' with a passion for understanding how our God-created bodies thrive or deteriorate based on what we put in it.
Paula
Paula
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About The Author

Paula

I’m Paula - like many of you I wear a lot of hats. Child of God, wife of 20 years, homeschooling mom of 6 earthly children, reluctant cook, chocolate-snatcher, and health and fitness coach at WholeIntentionsFitness.com. Various family health issues including Lyme disease and candida has turned me into a 'researcher' with a passion for understanding how our God-created bodies thrive or deteriorate based on what we put in it.

108 Comments

  • Carla

    Reply Reply May 23, 2009

    Paula,
    I’ve been using the original recipe you gave me and we love it. I’m going to try the “tweaks”. I think I’m going to love them 🙂
    Carla

  • Paula

    Reply Reply May 24, 2009

    Carla,

    Tweaking is something I just can’t not do 🙂 Glad you like it – let me know how it goes!

  • kellyc

    Reply Reply May 26, 2009

    Hi Paula, so I made this but hadn’t found millet so I substituted rice flour for it. But, I just found the millet and haven’t used the bread flour mix yet. I’d really like to try the millet in it, any suggestions for adding millet flour to the mix I already made? Thanks(again!) Kelly

  • Paula

    Reply Reply May 27, 2009

    Kelly,

    If you’ve already made the Bread Flour Mix with rice flour in place of the millet, I’d say go ahead and use it that way. The next time you make the mix you can use millet and that will give you a chance to decide which one you like the best.

    You could possibly use 2 1/2 c. of the Bread Flour Mix and add 1/2 c. of millet to the recipe to equal the 3 cups needed. This will alter your starch ratio, but not enough to make a huge difference. You will still have the rice flour in the mix, but you can get a taste for the millet too.

    If the loaf doesn’t turn out how you like it, you can always use it for croutons or bread crumbs.

    Have fun experimenting!

  • kellyc

    Reply Reply May 28, 2009

    woohoo! Let me say it again! “woohoo!” We have a bread winner! I tried it with the 2 1/2 cups of the mix I had and the 1/2 cup millet. 1st loaf is out and sliced for lunch…delicious. 2nd loaf is rising. This is hands down our favorite so far and I love that it doesn’t require eggs! =0) Kellyc

  • Paula

    Reply Reply May 28, 2009

    Kelly,

    I’m sooo happy it worked for you! I don’t think the happy dance is done by anyone as much as the gluten free who have finally found a bread recipe that tastes GOOD! I happy danced a LOT over this one!

    It is nice that it doesn’t require eggs. That, I think, is one of the hardest things to replace and still get decent results. You can’t even tell a loaf of this bread doesn’t have any.

    I’ve doubled the recipe before without a problem. That way I can make the mess just once, use the oven less, and have frozen bread on hand as well.

    Woohoo! Glad it worked!

  • kellyc

    Reply Reply May 28, 2009

    I have been making a cookbook binder that is completely gfcf. Forgot to mention earlier that my son said, and I quote, “This bread is super good Mom. You need to put this in the cookbook.” =0) Done!

  • Anonymous

    Reply Reply July 6, 2009

    I quadrupled the recipe in my Bosh and the bread is baking in my oven as I type. I can't wait to try it. It looks really good. I'm curious how you turn it into pull apart dinner rolls? The picture looks yummy. The dough seems too runny to form into balls. Do you form it into balls after it rises?

    Thanks,
    Laura

  • Paula

    Reply Reply July 6, 2009

    Laura,

    A quadrupled batch! Wow, I'm going to have to try that!

    Thanks for asking about the pull-apart dinner rolls. I've modified my post to explain it, but in case you miss it, here's the secret:

    I use a muffin scoop.

    The dough should be a tad thicker than cake batter. I scoop it up in a muffin sized scoop and just drop the dough in rows of three. I leave a bit of room in between them, maybe a 1/2 to 1 inch or so.

    I use a 9×13 cake pan that has been greased well. I let them rise about the same time – enough to get just to the top of the pan. I cover them with tin foil for the first ten minutes just like I do the bread and I bake them the same amount of time and at the same temperature.

    I often bake a loaf of bread and a pan of dinner rolls in the same oven, right next to each other.

    I hope this helps! 🙂

  • Anonymous

    Reply Reply July 8, 2009

    Paula,

    Thanks for the directions. I'm going to try it. The bread is great. My husband was rebelling against the bread I was making. He is now a happy camper again. I like to bake enough bread to last a week. Quadrupling it worked great. I put two loaves in the freezer. There seemed to be more room in my bowl, so I may try to do 5 or 6 loaves next time.

    Laura

  • regee0304

    Reply Reply January 13, 2011

    Hi,
    I tryed this today but had to use butter cause I have not coconut oil. It turned out a tad 'wet' & Ii even cooked it longer:-( I'm still going to eat it, it tastes GOOD!! I'm just going to have to toast it:-)

  • Lover of Beauty

    Reply Reply February 12, 2011

    I have a Gluten Free, Corn Free friend coming to stay, and I gave this a go last night. I made the following substitutions:

    ~ I used Butter for the Coconut Oil

    ~ I used 2 tsp whole Chia seeds, in 2.5 tsp boiling water to replace the Xanthan Gum

    ~ I used 3/4c Arrowroot + 1/4c Tapioca Starch + 1/12th tsp Guar Gum to replace the Cornstarch

    ~ I coulnd't figure out where the second measure of water (2 Tbsp) was supposed to go, so I left it out.

    The bread doesn't look like yours – it didn't rise anywhere near that much, and is maybe a little heavier, but not toooo bad.

    I'm not GF myself, so have no idea how good or bad GF bread gets…but I would like to eat this stuff myself, I *liked* the taste and texture. I have frozen the loaf, and will see how it goes on defrost!

    Thank you so much for your help with this recipe – explaining your flour mixes and everything. This site has been a real help, and despite the fact that *everyone* says not to try make GF bread, as your first experiment…I think it went surprisingly well! So thank you! 🙂

  • Paula

    Reply Reply February 12, 2011

    Lover of Beauty,

    Hats off to you for tackling gluten free bread right off the bat.

    I've never cooked with chia seeds myself so I'm not sure if that made the difference between our loaves or not. The butter vs. coconut oil shouldn't change it much as they are both fats.

    The 2 T. of water should be combined with the 1 1/2 c. of water to make just a bit more than 1 1/2 c. Gluten free cooking is picky that way – just a Tablespoon or two can make a lot of difference.

    I'm so glad you tried it. You deserve a hug for going the extra mile for your friend!

  • So glad you found a great alternative! Wouldn’t want to miss out on some yummy bread that seems to go great with everything ;).

  • I’m so excited to try this! I’ve been looking for a recipe like this! My little girl can’t have gluten, dairy or egg!

    • Paula

      Reply Reply June 12, 2012

      Hope it proves to be a winner at your house! Thanks for stopping by!

  • Jane

    Reply Reply June 13, 2012

    Yum – this looks so good! I found your site from the Frugal Days, Sustainable Ways blog hop – I love your site! Can’t wait to try this bread! I don’t normally use GF Flour Blends because I can’t eat grains, but I will have to try a few things and see if I can get your recipe to work! Thank you for sharing!

  • Thank you for your submission on Nourishing Treasures’ Make Your Own! Monday link-up.

    Check back later tonight when the new link-up is running to see if you were one of the top 3 featured posts! 🙂

  • pretty sure you need the sugar for the yeast.. but who know..

    • Paula

      Reply Reply June 20, 2012

      Good call Jen – I re-worded the recipe to make it clearer. 🙂

  • Gretchen @gfedge

    Reply Reply June 20, 2012

    I don’t eat much bread anymore but I would like to try this in the fall when it is not so hot here in Texas! Thanks for sharing . . .

  • Jayne

    Reply Reply June 27, 2012

    Have you tried this recipe in a bread machine??

    • Paula

      Reply Reply June 27, 2012

      No Jane, I haven’t. Several years ago my bread machine ‘walked’ off the counter (had it too close to the edge!) and fell. I replaced it with a Bosch before Travis found out about his allergy so I’ve never used a bread machine for my gluten-free recipes.

      If you feel adventurous enough to try it I hope you come back and tell us how it worked. 🙂

  • Anna

    Reply Reply July 15, 2012

    I have a stupid question, I do not have a bosch (honestly don’t know what that is) so I would be mixing this dough with my stand mixer, should I use the dough hook, or the paddle? And also, is it as simple as “mixing on high for 2 minutes” no kneading? or anything?
    Thanks so much, I just learned my little guy has several allergies.

    • Paula

      Reply Reply July 15, 2012

      Anna,

      No question is a stupid question! How else do we learn? 🙂

      Bosch is the brand of my mixer. I bought it to do large loaves of ‘regular’ wheat bread and then shortly thereafter found out about our allergies. I still use it to make this gluten-free bread because it has a nice large bowl and I often make more than one loaf at a time.

      Gluten-free bread dough is completely different than wheat bread dough. You can use paddles, regular beaters, or the dough hook. And yes, it is as simple as “mixing on high for two minutes” (hard to believe, I know!) There is no kneading and no punching down. It’s like thick cake batter that you pour into your bread loaf pan, wait for it to rise, and bake it. That’s it.

      Hope this helps – and that you have success making it. Let me know if you have any questions in the process!

  • Anna

    Reply Reply July 15, 2012

    Thank you so much Paula, I’m excited to try this!

  • Joli

    Reply Reply August 14, 2012

    We LOVED this bread the first time I made it. My husband hasn’t been happy with any other gf bread I’ve tried since we went gluten free a year and a half ago. He said this bread was the best bread ever! This time I’m trying replacing about a third of the starch ratio for oat flour, along with the sorghum and millet. I’d love the starch ratio to be a little lower. I’m hoping it tastes just as excellent. 🙂

    • I’m glad your husband enjoys it – I remember how glad Travis was to finally eat bread again. He’s come to the point now that he rarely eats any bread at all so I haven’t made this recipe in over a year – that and the too much starch issue.

      I’d love to hear how it turns out with the oat flour though. 🙂

      • Joli

        Reply Reply August 15, 2012

        Thanks! The flavor was still excellent, but it didn’t rise quite as much as it did the first time around. My loaf pans are a little smaller, so I may have adjusted the proportions too low. I think it would still be worth trying to lower the starch ratio and maybe just let it rise a little longer.

  • Charlotte Moore

    Reply Reply August 21, 2012

    Have you ever used Jules GF flour? I just wondered if that would work instead of all the combos. I may give it a try.

    • I’ve never tried Jules GF flour – but my guess is that any premixed GF combo would work. 🙂 Let us know what you think of it if you try it.

  • Charlotte Moore

    Reply Reply August 21, 2012

    Well, I just took it out of the oven and it was beautifully risen and I was so proud. However, after I let it set the 5 mins. then took it out of the pan and placed on a wire rack. Both sides were sunk in and it looked awful. I am sure it is a big mess of doughy bread the way it looks. I will use your mix next time. )-:

    Everyone has said just use that flour in place of whatever the recipe calls for and their stuff has been great. I made a loaf of cinnamon bread and it was good, but it did not have yeast and it was her recipe.

    • Paula

      Reply Reply August 21, 2012

      Hmm – sorry it didn’t turn out! Maybe try it with my mix and see how it turns out – it might be something else all together.

  • Susan Lohnes

    Reply Reply December 28, 2012

    I made your wonderful bread and had picture perfect results ! My taste buds were pleasantly surprised. Currently I am looking for a cinnamon roll recipe made with yeast GF and dairy and egg free. Do you have any?
    Hopeful,
    Susan

    From China Village, Maine

    • Paula

      Reply Reply December 31, 2012

      Hi Susan,

      I’m so glad the recipe turned out! I don’t have a cinnamon roll recipe, but something tells me you could drop a little of this bread dough into a muffin tin and swirl in a nice mixture of cinnamon and sugar in each one – then maybe drizzle on some powdered sugar and butter frosting as they were cooling. What do ya think?

  • Mary-Ann

    Reply Reply January 6, 2013

    Hi Paula,

    I have tried soooo many recipes, and all of them come out gummy in the middle. This loaf turned out so beautiful, and light, I was excited until I cut into it. What am I doing wrong? I have tried 2 different yeasts, oven and bread maker.

    Thanks for your help.

    • Paula

      Reply Reply January 7, 2013

      I’m sorry you’re bread is turning out gummy – that was one of my biggest complaints in trying to find a good bread recipe too. Do you let the loaf cool completely before you cut into it? Did you change anything in the recipe?

  • Mary-Ann

    Reply Reply January 7, 2013

    Hi Paula,

    The only thing I did different in this recipe, was didn’t add all the water. There are some that ask for an egg, and I use an egg replacer, but other than that, I haven’t got the courage to change anything yet! 🙂

    • Paula

      Reply Reply January 7, 2013

      Are you sure your oven temp is accurate? That’s the only thing I can think of.

      • Mary-Ann

        Reply Reply January 7, 2013

        I would hope so!! It is 3 months old. I will grab a oven thermometer today when I go to town and see what that comes in at, if there is a difference I will try another loaf tomorrow morning and let you know it goes!!! 🙂

        Thanks Mary-Ann

  • Mary-Ann

    Reply Reply January 8, 2013

    So, It a bought an oven thermometer, and my oven is only out about 10degrees. I tried another loaf this morning, and it still came out a tad bit gummy, not as bad as it has been, still edible. This is still the closest I have come to making a GF bread!!!

    • Paula

      Reply Reply January 8, 2013

      It might depend on how high you are above sea level – not sure how much difference that would make though. If I were in your shoes, I’d bake it a bit longer and make sure it’s completely cooled before you cut into it. I’ve also heard that if you spray your knife with oil it will cut through better.

      • Mary-Ann

        Reply Reply January 9, 2013

        Interesting! OK, I will definetly try that! It smells sooooo good, that Im not going to give up! Im soo close 🙂
        Have you tried milling your own flours? I tried but it seems as if it is missing something?

  • Paula

    Reply Reply January 9, 2013

    Yes, all the flours I use in this recipe (except for the starches) I mill at home. The GF Flour Mix I use is millet flour, sorghum flour, tapioca flour, potato starch, and arrowroot powder. If you click on the ingredient in the recipe it will take you to the directions to make the mix.

  • Sarah

    Reply Reply January 10, 2013

    Dear Paula,

    Just wondering what temp to set my oven if I were to bake 2 loaves of this bread recipe?

    • Paula

      Reply Reply January 13, 2013

      I keep the same setting. I’ve baked up to three loaves at a time.

  • T.J.

    Reply Reply January 19, 2013

    Say, I’m eager to give this recipe a go, but I don’t have any rapadura sugar. Could I substitute another sweetener? If so which of these would be best: Coconut Palm Sugar, stevia/cane, honey, or plain ole regular white sugar?

    Thanks in advance. May you be blessed this day!

    • Paula

      Reply Reply January 19, 2013

      Hi T.J. – I think either coconut palm sugar or cane sugar would work well. I’d say regular white sugar – but if you can avoid it (for health reasons) it would be better. 🙂

  • T.J.

    Reply Reply January 19, 2013

    Oh my goodness, I almost forgot to ask a very important question! In your GF flour mix do you pack the flours in the measuring cup when measuring?

    Thanks again! ;o)

    • Paula

      Reply Reply January 19, 2013

      I don’t pack the flours. I’m not an ‘exact’ measuring kind of cook so I just scoop it and dump it in the bowl. LOL I’d love to hear how it turns out for you!

  • Rachel

    Reply Reply January 28, 2013

    So excited to try this. My newborn is MSPI, and since I am nursing her I cannot eat dairy, eggs, or soy. Her symptoms are not completely gone, so we are removing wheat as well. I kept searching for a good plain (re: not banana or pumpkin bread) bread recipe with little luck. Cannot wait to whip up a loaf!

    • Paula

      Reply Reply January 28, 2013

      I hope it works for you Rachel – I’d love to hear what you think of it!

  • Donna

    Reply Reply February 11, 2013

    Could you please make this recipe printer friendly so I do not have to print out all the extra advertisments and comments. I am not computer savy enough to know how to just print the recipe and not the rest of the stuff. It is a waste of printer ink and paper to print out all this unnecessary stuff.

    thanks

    • Paula

      Reply Reply February 13, 2013

      Hey Donna,

      One of my coming plans is to implement a recipe printer program. It might take a bit, but I’m working my way there. 🙂

      • Paula

        Reply Reply February 13, 2013

        In the meantime, try just printing this:

        Wonderful Gluten-Free Bread (casein-free, egg-free, gluten-free, nut-free)

        3 c. GF Flour Mix
        2 t. xanthan gum
        1/2 T. celtic sea salt
        3 T. rapadura sugar (I’ve cut the amount in half and no one noticed – I doubt you’d even need it except for the yeast.)
        1/2 T. dry yeast
        2 t. coconut oil
        1 1/2 c. + 2 T. warm water

        Directions:
        1. Grease one 8×4 loaf pan. Heat oven to 200 degrees F and then turn the oven off.
        2. Combine GF Flour Mix, xanthan gum, celtic sea salt, sugar, and dry yeast in a medium sized bowl and whisk together. Set aside.
        3. Combine the coconut oil and warm water together and then combine with the dry ingredients. Mix on high for 2 minutes. This should resemble a thicker cake batter.
        4. Pour batter into prepared pan, cover with plastic wrap (optional but helps top appear smoother), and set in warmed oven to rise. Shut the oven door.
        5. The bread will take about 20 min. to rise to just below the top of the pan. Take the bread out carefully and set aside. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.
        6. When the bread has risen just to the top of the pan, bake it for 10 min. (Mine rose just a tad too much.)
        7. Place a tin foil ‘tent’ over the bread (resist all temptation to poke it!) and bake for an additional 35-45 minutes.
        8. Test the bread with a toothpick. After you’ve removed the bread from the oven, immediately rub the top with a stick of butter. Let the loaf cool about 5 minutes before removing to a wire rack. And no matter what, do not lick the top of the loaf!
        9. Let cool completely before cutting. I can never resist cutting just a small corner, but it cuts much, much easier if you let it cool first.
        10. These also work great as pull-apart dinner rolls. If you let the dough sit a bit longer after you’ve mixed it, it will thicken to the point that you can scoop the dough in a muffin-sized scoop and drop it in rows of three. I leave a bit of room in between them, maybe a 1/2 to 1 inch or so.

        I use a 9×13 cake pan that has been greased well. I let them rise about the same time – enough to get just to the top of the pan. I cover them with tin foil for the first ten minutes just like I do the bread and I bake them the same amount of time and at the same temperature.

  • Jan

    Reply Reply May 1, 2013

    Hi there, this is my first attempt at baking GF bread for my DD (I regularly bake ww bread in a breadmaker). I feel like this is a silly question but by “dry yeast”, do you mean traditional “active dry yeast” or “instant dry yeast”? I use breadmaker yeast for my bread machine. I’m a newbie! 🙂
    Thank you for the recipe! I went out and bought all the flours and I’m excited to bake this beauty!

    • Paula Miller

      Reply Reply May 7, 2013

      Jan,

      I’m so behind on replying to comments – I’m sorry!

      Yes, in this recipe I refer to active dry yeast. I’ve never tried this in a bread machine so I’d be interested in hearing how it turns out!

  • Leah

    Reply Reply August 8, 2013

    Ok, so this bread is just stupid, crazy delicious!!!Thank you for this recipe!! This is a perfect addition to my recipe collection! My clients thank you as well!!!

  • Jen

    Reply Reply September 13, 2013

    Hi, will you tell me how to make this recipe in a bread maker? thanks!

    • Paula Miller

      Reply Reply September 14, 2013

      Hi Jen,

      I’ve never had good results with bread machines, even in our pre gluten-free days, so I’ve never tried this recipe in a bread machine. Sorry!

  • Rebeccah Andrews

    Reply Reply November 8, 2013

    Hi!! I am in the process of making this recipe. I used Namaste Foods Gluten free Perfect Flour blend flour but followed the rest of the recipe to a T. However my dough was thick like cookie dough and after spending 20 min in my oven. The loaf hasn’t risen at all. Any suggestions? I am wondering if maybe because my flour had xanthan gum in it and then I added more gaur gum if that isn’t the problem?

    • Paula

      Reply Reply November 9, 2013

      I’ve never used that flour blend before so I don’t know what’s in it. Anytime you change ingredients like that it’s going to turn out differently than what my experience was. Gluten-free breads are notorious for being very picky about amounts used So it could be a number of things that changed the texture and thickness.

  • Jeri

    Reply Reply November 22, 2013

    When I made the bread the first time it barely rose at first too after the first 30 minutes. I was in a hurry so I just put some Saran Wrap on it and put it in the fridge. When I came home a number of hours later it had risen just fine. After I looked at the recipe and saw that I had misread the yeast measurement. It is 1/2 tbsp yeast, not 1/2 tsp. I baked it and it came out fine.

  • Rosemary

    Reply Reply February 8, 2014

    Can I use sunflower oil or any other oil instead of the coconut oil?
    Thanks.

    • Paula Miller

      Reply Reply February 9, 2014

      You *can* use another oil, but I honestly don’t recommend anything but coconut oil for baking. No other oils are safe to cook with at that temp. – even olive oil.

      Butter would be a good option too. 🙂

  • Rosemary

    Reply Reply February 13, 2014

    Should have also asked if the T in your recipes are for teaspoons? Thanks

    • Paula Miller

      Reply Reply February 18, 2014

      Yes, a capital T means Tablespoon. 🙂

      • Rosemary

        Reply Reply February 19, 2014

        Therefore the small t is for teaspoons – yes?

        • Paula Miller

          Reply Reply February 19, 2014

          Yep!

          • Rosemary

            March 13, 2014

            Well I bought the coconut oil and some arrowroot but I’m sorry to say it was a disaster. It didn’t rise very well and it was sticky. Also the next day it was a hard as a brick. No good even when toasted. So the birds got a treat!! Don’t know what went wrong as I followed the recipe exactly.

          • Paula

            March 13, 2014

            I’m sorry it didn’t turn out for you. You said you followed the recipe exactly so I’m guessing your measurements were right on. . .Second time’s the charm? 🙂

  • darkchocolatekryptonite

    Reply Reply March 17, 2014

    I am new to gluten free baking. I have some almond flour but no other wheat substitutes. Do I need to use so many different flours to make a loaf of bread? If so, I guess it will be a while before I can get back to the health food store for some! Thanks fo your help!

  • Becca

    Reply Reply April 5, 2014

    Can/should the flour mix for this bread be soaked first? Would soaking change any part of the original recipe instructions?

    Thanks!
    – Becca

    • Paula

      Reply Reply April 11, 2014

      I don’t think soaking would make any difference, you’re basically delaying the time you’ve mixed it to the time you bake it.

      The only think I would do is not add the yeast until later. You could mix it all up (except the yeast) and let it soak, then when you’ve got time set aside to bake it, you add the yeast and let it do it’s rising.

  • Shawn Betchley

    Reply Reply June 13, 2014

    I absolutely LOVE this bread recipe – actually found it on another site with the recipe calling simply for “sugar”, so I’ve just been using organic cane sugar. It was a little too sweet for us, so I cut the sugar down to about 1 T. Even my non-GF family thought it was good bread! Makes life so much easier to find one more thing I don’t have to make as separate dishes!

    I did find that it rises better for me and has a better texture if I use a wet-rise process than letting it rise in the oven. Will definitely be following your website for more great ideas. 🙂

  • Georgie

    Reply Reply September 1, 2014

    I love the bio that you gave and I could not agree with you more. Blessings and I am excited to try the bread recipe!!

  • martin Woolf

    Reply Reply September 21, 2014

    Hi Paula

    I tried your Gluten free bread recipe at the weekend, but things didn’t quite go as expected.
    I used a bread flour blend from Dove Farm, and olive oil instead of coconut oil (due to cost).

    The dough went pretty solid very quickly and I ended up mixing it by hand. The loaf only rose slightly and was very dense in texture. While hot the bread was okay, but as it cooled not so nice.

    Any ideas where/why this might have gone wrong.

    Many Thanks

    Martin

    Hampshire England

    • Paula

      Reply Reply September 21, 2014

      Hi Martin,

      🙁 I’m sorry your loaf didn’t turn out. What a disappointment!

      M guess would be the flour you used. Without knowing what kinds of flours they use in it, or what portions of each flour – it’s hard to say for sure. But when you said that the dough became pretty thick right away, I’d guess they’re using a different blend than what I am.

      Do you have access to sorghum or millet flours to try it with the GF Flour Mix?

      • martwoolf

        Reply Reply September 22, 2014

        Hi Paula,

        You must think me rude, my first comment and I’m moaning. I’m new to this game, but understand there is a lot of trial and error. I have just checked the Dove Farm website and the flour blend contains ‘Natural Gum’, so maybe I don’t need the xanthan Gum.

        I have only been gluten free for a few months, but really miss crusty fresh bread, so I’ll keep experimenting.

        Congratulations on a great website.

        • Paula

          Reply Reply September 22, 2014

          Trying to tackle gluten-free bread isn’t rudeness – it’s just trying to tackle gluten-free bread. 🙂 I didn’t think you were rude at all!

          I think you’re onto a good idea – cutting out the xanthan gum if it’s already listed in their ingredients.

          Let me know how your experiments turn out!

  • Kristen

    Reply Reply September 28, 2014

    So glad I found you! I, also, love Jesus, am a mom of five, and homeschool!

    • Paula

      Reply Reply September 28, 2014

      And I’m so glad you’re here! 🙂 Feel free to browse around and ask questions!

  • Loz

    Reply Reply November 20, 2014

    Hello from the UK

    Well first stage done, I made dough into ‘cobs’ – cobs are buns. They have risen in the warmed oven and I am about to bake them. I adjusted recipe slightly so no idea if it will work or taste right, but hey trial and error. I used xylitol and honey as I don’t have sugar of any kind in the home. I used the xylitol just in case it needed some sweetness, but I believe sugar substitutes don’t activate yeast, but honey does so I added a bit of honey to do that job. Honey is the only non vegan food I eat, I guess the last food item that I haven’t stopped eating yet since becoming vegan, but I will when it feels right for me. I was wondering whether jaggery would activate yeast! I am always trying to eat healthily and avoid sugar, and came across jaggery. I know its probably still not healthy but its not as bad as refined sugar. I made jaggery into some syrup very easily and I used it in some vegan cake recipe and it worked, I may try it in the bread to see if it activates the yeast, unless someone can tell me whether they have used it in bread recipes! I really hope this works, GF bread is not easy for me to make. Glad there is no cornstarch, as I can’t eat that, and I am not a big fan of oat flour, so these flours seem good for me. I really want a good bread for the winter days here in the UK. I have a good Chapati recipe that is great, but never managed a bread yet, so fingers crossed.

    Loz

  • Loz

    Reply Reply November 20, 2014

    Update. First try it was ok but unfortunately not to my taste. I don’t think I like the taste of Millet or is it the sorghum flour, I’ve used both before in baking and not been fond of the taste, so may be I need substitute either one or both of these flours with another, any suggestions. I wondering if Amaranth flour would work as I like Amaranth flour in my Chapatis. The other problem was the buns were very hard on the outside, may be I over cooked them! Inside was ok nothing like your picture, more stodgy, but cooked enough. I will not waste them, I will crumble them up into bread crumbs and use them in another recipe. Back to the drawing board. I was wondering whether there is a ratio of certain flours to starch that is best for GF breads, if we get the ration right then may be it is easier to substitute!

    • Paula

      Reply Reply November 21, 2014

      It would definitely be okay to substitute amaranth flour for either the millet or sorghum. As far as the buns being hard, I really don’t know what effect the honey would have – if that would affect GF flours like that or not. It would definitely seem to me that it would affect the cooking time though, so you might be right in that you might have over baked them.

      • Loz

        Reply Reply November 22, 2014

        Good point re the honey, I will get some sugar but only use a bit for the yeast to activate and I will try substituting one flour at a time so I can see which flour taste I am not keen on. Thanks

  • akling62

    Reply Reply December 21, 2014

    This bread was delicious! The only downfall was an air bubble in the middle of the loaf which isn’t that big of a deal we just can’t use it for sandwiches. I don’t have a mixer so I’m thinking I didn’t mix well enough perhaps. Without a mixer, what do you suggest for this bread? Just mixing by hand?

    • Paula

      Reply Reply December 22, 2014

      I’ve always used a mixer, but you can certainly do it by hand – it will help you form nice biceps. 🙂

  • Palma Kunkel

    Reply Reply January 17, 2015

    I have tried this recipe twice with the same results. I cannot get the dough to rise sufficiently to make a usable loaf of bread. My dough does not resemble a thick cake batter, but rather a very thick cookie batter. The 1 1/2 plus 2 T of water does not give me the results. I used your recipe for the bread flour mixture and followed the recipe as exactly as possible. Should I increase the amount of water to make the batter thinner?

    • Paula

      Reply Reply January 17, 2015

      Yes, I would try to add more water then. It shouldn’t be quite as thick as cookie dough. Is your yeast fresh? That might have something to do with it too.

  • Georgie

    Reply Reply January 21, 2015

    Greetings!!! I am thankful to have ran across this recipe. What a delight to make and to eat!!! The BEST BREAD RECIPE EVER!!! I am a GF Vegan and gave up finding bread that didn’t choke me or weigh a ton. I share many of your interests as well so it has been great to read your bio and glean from your trials in cooking. I pray blessings of abundance for you and your family and all you are doing.

    • Paula

      Reply Reply January 22, 2015

      I’m so glad you’re enjoying it! Thank you for the kind words and smile they brought to my face. 🙂 Have a great day!

  • Cassie

    Reply Reply February 23, 2015

    I followed the recipe to a T, but bread hasn’t risen much in the 200 degree oven… 🙁 any ideas?

    • Paula

      Reply Reply February 25, 2015

      Hmm. How old was your yeast?

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